5 Most Common Grammatical Errors People Make Thinking is Correct

5 Most Common Grammatical Errors People Make Thinking is Correct

Many people likely use common words when talking but they don’t know that what they are actually saying isn’t correct at all.

 But, even if you draw their attention towards that, they will still stand with their errors because they think it is the right word to use at that particular time.

Common Grammatical Errors

Well, even you that is reading this article now, you still do such a mistake. So, the question now is; what are the most common grammatical errors you make and how you can correct the errors.

Most Common Grammatical Errors

Error #1: Run-on Sentence or Comma Splice

A run-on sentence is a sentence that joins two independent clauses without punctuation or the appropriate conjunction. A comma splice is similar to a run-on sentence, but it uses a comma to join two clauses that have no appropriate conjunction.

Fixing a run-on sentence or a comma splice can be accomplished in one of five different ways:

  • Separate the clauses into two sentences.
  • Replace the comma with a semi-colon.
  • Replace the comma with coordinating conjunction–and, but, for, yet, nor, so, or.
  • Replace the comma with subordinating conjunction–after, although, before, unless, as, because, even though, if, since, until, when, while.
  • Replace the comma with a semi-colon and transitional word–however, moreover, on the other hand, nevertheless, instead, also, therefore, consequently, otherwise, as a result.

For example:

  • Incorrect: Rachel is very smart, she began reading when she was three years old.
  • Correct: Rachel is very smart. She began reading when she was three years old.
  • Correct: Rachel is very smart; she began reading when she was three years old.
  • Correct: Rachel is very smart, for she began reading when she was three years old.
  • Correct: Because Rachel is very smart, she began reading when she was three years old.
  • Correct: Rachel is very smart; as a result, she began reading when she was three years old.

Error #2: Pronoun Errors

Pronoun errors occur when pronouns do not agree in number with the nouns to which they refer. If the noun is singular, the pronoun must be singular. If the noun is plural, however, the pronoun must be plural as well. For example:

  • Incorrect: Everybody must bring their own lunch.
  • Correct: Everybody must bring his or her own lunch.

Pronoun errors are common; some would even say normal usage, in modern English, as writers try to avoid awkward phrasing or the implication of sexist language.

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Although this is an admirable goal, and may be acceptable in informal speech or writing, it is still important to learn the correct grammar and use it in more formal situations.

Error #3: Mistakes in Apostrophe Usage

Apostrophes are used to show possession. However, you do not use an apostrophe after a possessive pronoun such as my, mine, our, ours, his, hers, its, their, or theirs. For example:

  • Incorrect: My mothers cabin is next to his’ cabin.
  • Correct: My mother’s cabin is next to his cabin.

In the case of it’s, the apostrophe is used only to indicate a contraction for it is. For example:

  • Incorrect: Its a cold day for October.
  • Correct: It’s a cold day for October.

Error #4: Lack of Subject/Verb Agreement

When speaking or writing in the present tense, a sentence must have subjects and verbs that agree in number. If the subject is singular, the verb must be singular. If the subject is plural, the verb must be plural as well. For example:

  • Incorrect: These recipes is good for beginning chefs.
  • Correct: These recipes are good for beginning chefs.

Error #5: Misplaced Modifiers

To communicate your ideas clearly, you must generally place a modifier directly next to the word it is supposed to modify. The modifier should clearly refer to a specific word in the sentence. For example:

  • Incorrect: At eight years old, my father gave me a pony for Christmas.
  • Correct: My father gave me, at eight years old, a pony for Christmas.

I hope this article was informative? If yes, then if you have any questions concerning this article, don’t hesitate to drop a comment.

Editorial Staff

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